Sea Messenger

Found 25 November 1870, on the coast near Penzance, Cornwall.

In an airtight metal case with a boat-like bottom and a metal flag mounted on top:

Schooner Yacht Cambria, Nov. 26, 6.30 p.m., 1870, in lat. 49 18 N, long. 7 82 W.
Dear Sir,
We launched a ‘sea messenger’ to the deep with this enclosed. We have just finished taking third reefs in foresail and mainsail, as there is every appearance of a dirty night, but glad to say we have a fair wind—rather a new thing for us to have this passage. We had 15 days’ strong easterly winds, with high seas, from the 3rd to the 18th inst. We passed to-day, at 3.30 p.m., the American ship Enoch Talbot, bound up channel. There is every appearance now of strong westerly winds. We are going ten knots.
Yours truly,
R.S. TANNOCK, Master.

This was one of six messages contained in the “sea messenger”, launched from the Cambria as an experiment to test the new invention. Painted on the front of the metal case were instructions for it to be delivered to the nearest Lloyd’s agency, where an agent would open the case and forward the letters to their respective addresses. The case was duly delivered to Messrs Mathews, the Lloyd’s agents for Penzance, and this letter was forwarded to the address of a newspaper correspondent in Portsmouth.

“This ‘sea messenger’ is the invention of Mr Julius Vanderbergh, of Southsea, as a means of preserving papers, &c., from a ship lost, or in imminent danger of being lost, at sea,” explained the Chelsea News and General Advertiser. “If not seen and picked up by some passing vessel, the messenger will be almost certain eventually to drive on the land, and may thus convey ashore the tale of some helpless ship, whose loss, with all on board, could by no other means be learnt.” The newspaper said that the sea messenger’s capture near Penzance, and the subsequent delivery of its letters, was “evidence of perfect success”.

[Chelsea News and General Advertiser, 3 December 1870]

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Author: Paul Brown

Writes about football and history. Four Four Two, When Saturday Comes, The Blizzard etc. Latest book: Savage Enthusiasm: A History of Football Fans. Twitter: @paulbrownUK

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